At Bradley Physio we have over 20 years of experience treating lower limb injuries.

Pain and dysfunction in the lower limb may originate from anywhere between the spine and the little toe. Our team of highly skilled physiotherapists are experienced in assessing and diagnosing your problem, ensuring you receive the most effective treatment possible.

lower limb injuries

What Lower Limb Injuries do we treat?

Conditions We Treat
The hip is a ball and socket joint consisting of the thigh bone (femur) and the pelvis. There are many ligaments that support the bones, which provide considerable stability to the joint. Numerous muscles also attach around the hip to help move the joint. The hip joints undertake a lot of weight bearing and usage in our everyday lives and can be subjected to injury and degenerative changes. Often, you may start feeling hip pain for no apparent reason. Sometimes recreation or sporting activities put repetitive strain on the hip causing pain. If you feel pain in the front of the hip, this may be due to arthritis within the hip joint. In younger people, anterior hip and groin pain may be caused by hip femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Muscular strain around the hip can also cause pain in this area. Pain on the side of the hip can indicate a problem such as a trochanteric bursitis or Iliotibial band pain. Pain in the buttocks or back of the hip can be coming from either your back or your hip.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

Bursitis is the inflammation of the small fluid filled sacs that cushion the ligaments ,muscles and tendons around joints. This painful condition commonly occurs around the shoulder, elbow, hip and knee joints. It can be caused by direct trauma to the affected area or by repetitive overuse.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Often abnormal movement patterns of the affected limb, that may have led to repetitive irritation of the bursa, need to be corrected by the careful progression of specific strengthening and stretching exercises. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. If your pain fails to settle, your physiotherapist may discuss the option of administering a corticosteroid injection by our Specialist Physiotherapist, Patrick Bradley.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

The hip adductor muscles are a group of muscles on your inner thigh which help to move the legs together (adduction). Your body has five adductor muscles: adductor brevis, longus, magnus, pectineus and gracilis. A groin strain is an injury or tear to the tendon or muscle belly of the adductor muscles of the thigh. An adductor muscle strain is usually caused by sudden movements such as kicking, twisting to change direction while running or jumping.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

The four muscles on the front of the thigh are collectively known as the quadriceps muscle. A quadriceps strain, also known as a thigh strain, is a tear to the tendon or muscle of one of these four muscles. It can range from a mild discomfort to a full blown tear of most of the muscle resulting in severe pain and inability to walk. The quads are important for straightening the knee and bending the hip. A strain to these muscles is usually caused by activities such as sprinting, jumping or kicking, especially if a thorough warm-up has not been undertaken.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

There are three muscles on the back of the thigh that are collectively known as the hamstring muscle. A hamstring strain is a tear to one of these large muscles or their tendons. It can range from a mild discomfort to a full blown tear of most of the muscle resulting in severe pain and inability to walk. It is a very common injury in athletes and is usually occurs with activities such as sprinting, kicking and overstretching.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is a common disorder found in runners. The iliotibial band is a tight, ligamentous structure that runs along the outer border of the thigh. Iliotibial band syndrome is an overuse injury that occurs when the ITB becomes tight and inflamed. The pain usually occurs around the knee but can be experienced in the hip and thigh.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Often abnormal movement patterns of the affected limb, that may have led to repetitive irritation of the ITB, need to be corrected by the careful progression of specific strengthening and stretching exercises. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques may also be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

There are many types of knee injuries and conditions, which can be treated successfully with physiotherapy. These range from ligament and cartilage problems to tendon and muscular strains. Knee pain can also be due to overuse injuries, sudden injuries or conditions such as arthritis, gout or infections. Our physiotherapists are experts in assessing the cause of knee pain, reaching a speedy diagnosis and treating your problem effectively.
The two cartilages (menisci) within the knee joint reduce friction as the knee moves and they also act as a shock absorbers as we bear weight through our legs. Over a prolonged period of time they can be damaged as a result of natural wear and tear. On occasions the menisci can tear, particularly with injuries that involve twisting on a bent knee. This injury results in pain, swelling, difficulty walking, locking and giving way of the knee. How well the knee will heal and whether surgery will be needed depends in large part on the type and severity of the tear. The aim of physiotherapy will be to establish a programme that helps you regain as much strength and flexibility in your knee as possible and make your pain more manageable.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your injury. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. You will be advised on the use of ice if appropriate. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to an orthopaedic surgeon specialising in knee conditions the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

The patellofemoral joint is the joint created between the back of the kneecap and the thigh bone (femur). Patellofemoral joint pain is the most common cause of pain at the front of the knee. It normally comes on gradually but can be traumatic in origin, such as after a fall onto the kneecaps. Non-traumatic causes can be poor alignment of the knee joint leading to mal-tracking of the joint, excessive patellar movement and repetitive activities such as running and cycling. Altered tracking of the joint can be caused by muscle imbalance, a shallow groove in the femur, soft tissue tightness and overpronated (flat) feet. Pain generally develops over a period of time, and tends to be aggravated by any bent knee activities such as stairs, squatting and running.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from orthotics to correct the position of you feet to reduce the stress to the patellofemoral joint you will be advised accordingly and the necessary arrangements will be made for you.

Shin splints is the name given to pain along the bottom two thirds of the tibia (shin bone). It is a common cause of discomfort, often experienced during running. It is caused by repetitive stress to the soft tissues that lie along the border of the tibia. Those suffering from Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome will feel pain on the bony surface of the inner border of the shin during and following exercise. Shin splints typically presents with pain (dull ache) and palpable tenderness along the inside of the lower leg. Initially, the pain may be experienced at the beginning of a run but is relieved with continued activity. As the condition progresses pain may be present throughout the activity.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from orthotics to correct the position of you feet to reduce the stress on the tibia you will be advised accordingly and the necessary arrangements will be made for you.

An ankle sprain is caused by damage to one or more of the ligaments on the outside of your ankle. The purpose of a ligament is to join bone to bone and provide stability to a joint. The most common ligament to suffer an injury is that on the outside of the ankle known as the lateral collateral ligament.There are different grades of ligament sprains ranging from a grade 1, when the ligament has been overstretched, to grade 3, where the ligament fibres have completely ruptured. It is commonly caused by forcefully turning the foot inwards whilst running or walking on uneven ground. Associated injuries can be to the capsule surrounding the joint or even a fracture of the bone in more severe cases.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. You will be advised on the use of ice if appropriate. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

The plantar fascia is a thick band of tissue which runs across the sole of the foot connecting your heel bone to your toes, supporting the arch in your foot. If tension becomes too great, it can create small tears in the fascia causing the fascia to become irritated or inflamed, particularly around its attachment at the heel. This is commonly caused by overpronation of the foot, leading to excessive strain on the plantar fascia. The resulting pain is a condition known as plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis usually develops gradually. People with plantar fasciitis often describe an incredible pain in their heel when they take their first steps in the morning on the first few steps after getting up from a seated position. It can range from a sharp, stabbing pain to a dull ache.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If your pain fails to settle your physiotherapist may discuss the option of administering a corticosteroid injection by our Specialist Physiotherapist, Patrick Bradley. If your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from orthotics to correct the position of you feet to reduce the stress on the tibia you will be advised accordingly and the necessary arrangements will be made for you.

The calf muscle consists of two main muscles, the gastrocnemius and soleus. A tear in the calf muscle is referred to as a calf strain/tear and depending on its severity it is classified as a first, second or third degree strain. A calf strain usually occurs if the calf muscles are loaded too quickly or lack the strength required for the activity they are undertaking, such as a quick change in direction and jumping. Return to high load, high speed sports should be carefully guided by your physiotherapist to prevent re-tear.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

The Achilles tendon is a strong, fibrous band that connects the calf muscle to the heel. The calf is actually formed by two muscles, the underlying soleus and the thick outer gastrocnemius. Together, they form the calf muscles. The most common cause of pain in the achilles tendon is an achilles tendonitis/tendonosis or tendinopathy. This is commonly caused by overuse, leading to micro-injury of the fibres of the tendon. Due to the repetitive nature of the stresses the body is unable to repair the injured tissue. The resulting scar tissue can cause a thickening of the tendon.Classic features of an achilles tendonitis are the gradual onset of morning stiffness and pain, which may resolve within 5-10 minutes, and pain during and after exercise. If left untreated, the stiffness and pain might become more severe and persistent and lead to degenerative changes in the tendon, increasing the risk of a rupture.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from orthotics to correct the position of you feet to reduce the stress on the achilles tendon you will be advised accordingly and the necessary arrangements will be made for you.

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