At Bradley Physio we have over 20 years of experience treating Sports, Sprain & Soft Tissue injuries.

With injuries ranging from simple sprains to complex repetitive strain injuries no two problems are the same. Our team of highly skilled physiotherapists are experienced in assessing and diagnosing your problem, ensuring you receive the most effective treatment possible. Many clients will make use of our on-site gym facilities or specialised classes to maximise their recovery.

sports injuries

What Sports, Sprain & Soft Tissue injuries do we treat?

Conditions We Treat
A partial dislocation of the shoulder where the upper bone of the arm (humerus) is partially out of the socket (glenoid) is called a subluxation. A complete dislocation means the humerus is completely dislodged from the socket. In both cases the rotator cuff tendons will be injured and particularly with a complete dislocation they may be completely ruptured. Both partial and complete dislocation can lead to shoulder instability and the risk of re-injury is high. Complications may include a Bankart lesion (damage to the socket of the shoulder joint, Hill-Sachs lesion (injury to the head of the humerus), rotator cuff tear, or injury to the axillary nerve.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the specific cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Your treatment will focus on reducing pain and restoring the normal movement of the shoulder joint. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist will recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a Specialist Shoulder Surgeon the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint, keeping the head of your upper arm bone (humerus) firmly within the shallow socket of the shoulder (glenoid). They are prone to wear and tear with age. Rotator cuff injuries are commonly seen in those participating in sports such as swimming, tennis, badminton, squash and cricket. Your rotator cuff muscles and tendons are vulnerable to rotator cuff tears, rotator cuff tendonitis and rotator cuff impingement and related rotator cuff injuries. Rotator cuff injuries vary from mild tendon inflammation ( rotator cuff tendonitis), shoulder bursitis (inflamed bursa), calcific tendonitis (bone forming within the rotator cuff tendon) through to partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. You can suspect a rotator cuff injury if you have an arc of shoulder pain on movements overhead or clicking when your arm is at shoulder height or when your arm is overhead. The pain can extend from the top of your shoulder to your elbow or wrist. The pain can be present at rest but is often worse when lying on the affected side. It is often aggravated by activities that involve reaching or lifting, putting the hand behind the back or putting a seatbelt on.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Your treatment will focus on reducing pain and restoring the normal movement of the shoulder joint. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a Specialist Shoulder Surgeon the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

Despite the titles these conditions have many different causes. The difference between the two conditions lies in where the elbow is inflamed. They are commonly seen in those participating in sports involving repetitive use of the upper limb such as rowing, tennis, golf, badminton and squash. Both Tennis Elbow and Golfer’s Elbow are forms of epicondylitis, an inflammation of tendons that attach to the elbow. Tennis Elbow affects the lateral, or outside, epicondyle and Golfer’s Elbow affects the medial, or inside, epicondyle.The pain is usually relatively localised i.e there’s a specific spot that is painful, The pain is often aggravated by gripping activities with the hand, particularly with the arm outstretched. Bending and straightening the elbow may also cause discomfort.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a Specialist Upper Limb Surgeon the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

Occurs when one of the tendons that joins a muscle to a bone becomes inflamed. Tendonitis is commonly found amongst those participating in sports such as running, swimming, golf and tennis. This type of inflammation can typically get worse if left untreated over time due to persistent irritation of the affected site with repetitive use of the affected limb. As the pain subsides it is very tempting to return to sport or the aggravating activity too soon, preventing the affected tendon from fully healing. Pain may be present at the beginning of an activity and then disappear during activity itself, only to reappear when cooling down if the activity is prolonged. The pain is usually easily localised and usually described as ‘‘severe’’ or ‘‘sharp’’ during the early stages of the condition and sometimes as a ‘‘dull ache’’ once it has been present for some weeks.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the specific cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from orthotics or supports to reduce the stress on the affected tendon you will be advised accordingly and the necessary arrangements will be made for you.

The hip adductor muscles are a group of muscles on your inner thigh which help to move the legs together (adduction). Your body has five adductor muscles: adductor brevis, longus, magnus, pectineus and gracilis. A groin strain is an injury or tear to the tendon or muscle belly of the adductor muscles of the thigh. An adductor muscle strain is usually caused by sudden movements such as kicking, twisting to change direction while running or jumping. Adductor strains are commonly found amongst those participating in sports such as football, rugby, cricket, tennis, badminton, squash and sprinting.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

The four muscles on the front of the thigh are collectively known as the quadriceps muscle. A quadriceps strain, also known as a thigh strain, is a tear to the tendon or muscle of one of these four muscles. It can range from a mild discomfort to a full blown tear of most of the muscle resulting in severe pain and inability to walk. The quads are important for straightening the knee and bending the hip. A strain to these muscles is usually caused by activities such as sprinting, jumping or kicking, especially if a thorough warm-up has not been undertaken. Quadriceps strains and tears are commonly found amongst those participating in sports such as basketball, football, rugby, tennis, squash, running and sprinting.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

There are three muscles on the back of the thigh that are collectively known as the hamstring muscle. A hamstring strain is a tear to one of these large muscles or their tendons. It can range from a mild discomfort to a full blown tear of most of the muscle resulting in severe pain and inability to walk. It is a very common injury in athletes and is usually occurs with activities such as sprinting, kicking and overstretching.Hamstring injuries are commonly found amongst those participating in sports such as basketball, football, rugby, tennis, squash, running and sprinting.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, muscle energy techniques and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

An ankle sprain is caused by damage to one or more of the ligaments on the outside of your ankle. The purpose of a ligament is to join bone to bone and provide stability to a joint. The most common ligament to suffer unjury is that on the outside of the ankle known as the lateral collateral ligament.There are different grades of ligament sprains ranging from a grade 1, when the ligament has been overstretched, to grade 3, where the ligament fibres have completely ruptured. It is commonly caused by forcefully turning the foot inwards whilst running or walking on uneven ground. Associated injuries can be to the capsule surrounding the joint or even a fracture of the bone in more severe cases. Without proper treatment and rehabilitation, a more severe sprain can weaken the ankle—making it more likely that you will injure it again. Repeated ankle sprains can lead to long-term problems, including chronic ankle pain, arthritis, and ongoing instability. Ankle injuries are commonly found amongst those participating in sports such as basketball, dancing, football, rugby, tennis, squash, running and sprinting.

Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. You will be advised on the use of ice if appropriate. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home. We will aim to identify the cause of your injury and advise you on prevention in the future.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

A haematoma (hematoma) is a swelling of blood within the tissues.. Most commonly, haematomas are caused by an injury to the wall of a blood vessel, prompting blood to seep out of the blood vessel into the surrounding tissues. A hematoma can result from an injury to any type of blood vessel (artery, vein, or small capillary). In sport, this injury is usually a result of direct impact to an area. Haematomas are are commonly found amongst those participating in contact sports such as football, rugby, hockey, lacrosse and water polo.
Following a thorough verbal and physical examination your physiotherapist will aim to diagnose the cause of your problem. Your recommended, bespoke treatment plan will be discussed with you. You will be advised on the use of ice if appropriate. Specific manual therapy techniques including deep soft tissue massage, deep transverse friction massage, and stretches may be used. Other treatments may include acupuncture, electrotherapy and the use of sports tape. As you improve your physiotherapist may recommend a programme of rehabilitation exercises in our on-site rehab gym as well as exercises and stretches to continue independently at home.

NOTE If you are not making the progress we would expect and your physiotherapist thinks you will benefit from further investigations (x-rays,scans) and/or onward referral to a doctor specialising in your condition the necessary arrangements can be made by our team on your behalf.

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